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exist, if i would use the word "leveraging" people's expertise, it seems appropriate place for these presentations. it reflects what we are most successful at and when we are seeing the greatest success is when we're not in silos, and partnering with nonprofits, and in some cases for profit community. i know that personnel he i have had the opportunity to participate in many of the massage parlor inspections. that to me was another example of our city being incredibly innovative in figuring out a
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way to confront the challenges that we do face particularly in the area of human trafficking on one side. i think it all fits to having this hearing tonight, the work of the family violence council for me - i feel like a broken record, i feel it is a model, the benefit of being both a city and county, in some respects it is easier to bring all partner agencies together by choice or by hook. but i would urge us to continue to look at regional partnerships and for ways to support this beyond our boundaries.
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the crimes are not just within our boundaries. >> a want to make this comment before we go into public comment, more question than anything else. in the spirit of how i do business. this is the part of tonight's agenda. i'm not saying it should have been. but tonight looking at the response of domestic violence, the prosecution rates, the query reporting module, and the other things i'm curious about the status of women. at some point i would like to hear about any progress in prevention of any of these crimes.
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what we really want to do is go out of business. i never looked at the department as a prevention agency; some people do. they do the practice of police officers. i don't want to leave people feeling that this is inevitable. i am curious. they have conversations with folks about best practices or inroads? i am in the business of stopping young people from doing what adults do. they have meetings on, because obviously we don't want these things happening the first place. >> we do talk about this doctor marshall. integrating this into the public school curriculum, prevention, what is appropriate behavior, junior high dating, what are the
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boundaries for young women to set. behavioral models for young men. one thing i wanted to do more about is economic empowerment for women. as you can realize, the department has a small staff. at one time there were as many as 8-10 staff members. now we have 4.5 we sort of move our agenda as is necessary. the prevention -- intervention particularly -- is important to us particularly empowering women. it is even more difficult when there are financial issues and be able to be gainfully employed. >> this is not a criticism. i don't think - ideal of the
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same thing with the kids - i am saying, any opportunity that you hear about things progressing? when i talk to kids in school, is it really working? i want to leave it for me since i've had some success with young people i would be willing to offer to help in that area because like i said i don't like the in result. that so they want to stop.
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>> >> if anybody has a right to ask a question, that's dr. joe marshall. i am very dedicated and certainly this commission is very dedicated to doing the prevention work and we do need to have a broader conversation about that. i think that as we started out with the discussion, executive director dr. -- indicated that this year so far we have had 0, we have so many days left in this calendar year, talking calendar year not fiscal year. we have had zero homicides as a result of domestic violence. that is really something to take note of. i don't think that that has
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occurred by happenstance; it is not a statistical anomaly. i think it is because we are gearing our work more as preventative. preventative - the collaborative effort that we are working with, the various departments, the police department, the various partner agencies is in and of itself becoming more defined preventative. a lot we heard this evening is interventive; as we go forward the fruits of that labor become more definitively preventative. nonetheless i think that you are absolutely correct and that
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is correct question that we have to keep asking ourselves day-to-day. how do we behave? how do we make sure that we are moving our resources and directing our resources towards more preventative measures? if anything at all, i think in this particular year and i'll be the one to say it, is this: we have moved the conversation in the city from the idea that one, domestic violence is specifically a woman's issue. is not. that's why i asked the captain in terms of this issue of integration. it is not a women's issue solely, wholly, or inevitably. it is a community issue. is a social issue. it is a health issue.
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it is a multidimensional issue. it is not as we know, a private issue. is a community issue and so as we are thinking along that continuum from preventative to intervention to actually ending hopefully our domestic violence, we have to certainly acknowledge the fact that the needle is moving. and that the conversation is broadening and i think we are getting more specific and more expert amongst all the various departments. around the issue of domestic valiance. i'm very glad that we are having this meeting this evening. that is another milestone in terms of the conversation around how do we view and what are our values not only about
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intervening but presenting domestic violence in our community and understanding that he cannot, will not, i should not exist in any particular silo. it is not just an ideological issue. it does not belong to a particular class of women or minority; it is everyone's issue and everyone has a role to play. we need to make sure we presented and hopefully and it. prevention is very key. and a driving force in the work that we're doing through -- the department, and the work that we continue to do in this collaborative and comprehensive partnership. so every department, the police department, the public defenders office, the district attorney, department of public health -- other departments
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involved, the sheriffs department, all must be involved so we can become more preventative. >> thank you. any further questions for captain flaherty or lieutenant --? we will now move into the public comments section. it says five minutes total. the city attorney suggests that we give 2 minutes per person without a five-minute limit. >> speaker shall address remarks to the commission as a whole and not to individual commissioners, or department or occ personnel. neither police or occ personnel or commissioners are required
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to respond to questions, but may provide a brief response. occ personnel and police shall refrain from entering into a debate with speakers. limit your comments to two minutes. >> as any public comment regarding tonight presentations? there is no comment. before we move to the last item, we will like to adjourn in memory of some folks. i want to thank everyone from the bottom of my heart for tonight's presentation. a lot of work went into this from the commission staff, members of the commission and this was very important in light of recent events. our goal tonight was to let the public know that the san francisco police department,
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attorney's office, occ, the commission, we want to assure women and men dickens of domestic violence that we are here to help you. this is the community matter. we want to help break the cycle of violence. the presentations tonight were excellent. the message is very clear. the city and discounting takes domestic violence extreme we seriously. we have a police chief to support it and everyone in the room to support it. i cannot thank you enough. it was a great presentation. >> it was an honor to have this joint meeting. i hope it away 10 years to do it, particularly surrounded by the men and women in blue. i feel safer everyday.
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it is great to see you on the street but more importantly to have interaction with you and know that we have common goals. also to our immigrant communities, we are here to serve you and language barrier should not be an obstacle to seeking help nor your immigration status. we work hard. i am a fourth-generation san francisco. i'm taking cantonese and mandarin classes to reach out. i hope that for members of the community this was an enlightening experience to learn more. i thank everyone for participating, and the organizational aspects by the respective staff. >> vice president marshall: i like when the commission joins
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meetings, some more than others. there is more of a nexus. we should do it again. much sooner than never. and that we stay on top of this. there are times when just because things happen, there is a focus on it. partly what is happening the city and elsewhere, it will stay on this, reconvene, we can really do something about not only domestic violence but the triage that we have been talking about. a bit strong support that and i know my fellow commissioners would also. >> is there anything further? we would like to adjourn in honor of --
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>> i defer to commissioner -- >> if you allow me a personal moment to adjourn in memory of my mother-in-law. is rather appropriate because she was the mother of the san francisco police officer. she immigrated to this country, strong armenian woman, and had to go back to school to be reregistered as a nurse. she went back to state college later in life and completed courses where she received a teaching certificate to teach preschool at west porta in the early days of preschool days. she was small in stature, but i stood tall on her shoulders and women like her. >> i would also like to express condolences to mike nevans'
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family; he was a police inspector. i got to know him when he was state legislature. he is also the late uncle of someone who has been in the city -- pj johnston. >> also we would adjourn in honor of spector mike nevin. also sadly we have to adjourn in honor of three current san francisco officers. these are current members. our thoughts and prayers are with her family, their cohorts at the stations, tonight we
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adjourn in the memory of them and others. we are adjourned. >> in january everything changes. all of san francisco's parking meters will now be enforced 7 days a week. feeding the meter 7 days a week reduces parking demand in commercial corridors and for most faster turn over of the parking spaces. the muni system has improved for sunday. learn more about 7 day meters at sfmta.com. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for being here. you know, as we look through
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this year, there's obviously some incredible events that have occurred. and for me as mayor of san francisco, i know that the chief and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that.
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and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our
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hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is where i want to make sure i recognize all of the people that are in that effort of doing something about
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it, including the officials in san francisco. and some have been at this longer than others to try to do something about it, have reached limitations. yet again, i think this tragedy at sandy hook reminds us that we've got to keep trying and we've got to keep doing more about it. and, so, i want to first of all recognize that senator feinstein, in my conversations with her, and the tragedies she's experienced as mayor of san francisco as well as her attempts to ban assault weapons and had done so in the past, and that her federal assault legislation, while ended, she will reintroduce that in january and we will be big supporters of that. and she will continue dialoguing on a national level, and we will support her efforts and the efforts of all of our federal officials to do more, along with the president of the united states and congress to act. and, in fact, i joined over 750
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other mayors across this country, using social media and the technology that's available to us today to signal a demand to our congress that we really need a plan and a plan and an action to follow that, to ban these assault weapons and to make sure that we do everything we can to create a higher level of safety throughout the country. assault weapons and the types of things that we've seen in the hands of people who are doing evil or can do evil really have no place, in the home or in the schools or in our streets. and, so, with that we ask ourselves what we can do locally. i also want to recognize the three state senators, senator de leon, state senator leland yee and state senator ted gains, all three of which are sponsoring some five different pieces of state legislation
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aimed at banning assault weapons and munitions, getting higher levels of background checks and registries, and also i think senator gains is attempting to also make sure that those that have backgrounds of mental health challenges are lifetime bans of possessing these weapons. again, in an attempt to do what we can. in san francisco, we tried to ban assault weapons some years ago. we were unsuccessful in the courts in being able to do so. we are going to renew these efforts in light of the sandy hook sentiment and i know there's just a higher level of sentiment that causes us to focus even more on what we can do locally. in fact, this higher level of sentiment, as you'll hear from the police chief, has even caused one of the highest rates of gun return. certainly we paid some money for that, but he's going to tell you there are some
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individuals out there, in light of sandy hook, that returned their guns and without even asking for remuneration of those guns. and he'll explain that level of detail. but it was the highest level of gun return this past weekend that we were honored to share with our community partners in making sure that we get these guns off the streets. two pieces of legislation that we are introducing to the board of supervisors with the support of our police chief, our health department, and certainly being led by supervisor cohen whose district has experienced an inordinate amount of violence throughout this year. we talk about it all the time. what can we do? for one, the ammunition that has been designed especially by law enforcement for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing
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legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it.
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so, we are introducing a second piece of legislation about notification to our police chief of any of that kind of high level of purchase. these are at least two things that we are introducing today. there are potentially more to come, but we wanted to begin by taking action on this. and i stand here in front of you with a full display of some of the armory that was collected, turned in by people with the incentive of providing them with some remuneration of these weapons that were in their homes or other types of possession of this. and, of course, some of the ammunition that we will let you see that is not just body piercing, but designed to even be even more destructive. that's the reason why i have dr. campbell here. there have been many occasions, doctor, that i've been very thankful for you and your expert way of treating our
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patients whether firefighters or police officers are injured. but he has seen more than he should ever see of young -- youth who are victims of these bullets and the guns that we are talking about today. and he wants to explain the human side of this with our public health department officials. but i'd like to have further testimony by supervisor cohen of her experience and her leadership in helping me establish this. i will want to again put it in context that our city wants to intervene at an earlier stage. we want to do predictive policing. we want to support efforts throughout our community to organize them better so that we can prevent violence. this was at the heart of our work, introducing more support for our domestic violence advocates as well that we did just a few weeks ago. that with the heightened
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awareness of guns and the kinds of things that happen nationally, this is consistent with what we're willing to do. so, let me introduce at this time a good partner and the one that will be introducing this at the board, supervisor malia cohen. >> thank you. thank you, mr. mayor, for your leadership. and chief, thank you for your continuing efforts to be a tremendous advocate and partner. and our collective effort to address gun violence in our city. as the mayor mentioned, the tragic event that occurred at sandy hook elementary school last week was truly horrifying. and painful for all of us to sit back and witness. but i'm here today not to speak of last week's events in connecticut, but i'm here today because of the phone calls that i regularly get from many of the police officers that are here in this room today in the middle of the night. department officers informing me and alerting me of the violent shootings that are happening right here i

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December 24, 2012 7:00am-7:30am PST

TOPIC FREQUENCY San Francisco 12, Us 7, Marshall 2, Dr. Campbell 2, Cohen 2, Connecticut 2, Sandy 2, Mike Nevans 1, Dr. Joe Marshall 1, Flaherty 1, United States 1, Spector Mike Nevin 1, Porta 1, Occ 1, Johnston 1, De Leon 1, City 1, West 1, The City 1, Obama 1
Network SFGTV
Duration 00:30:00
Scanned in San Francisco, CA, USA
Source Comcast Cable
Tuner Channel 89 (615 MHz)
Video Codec mpeg2video
Audio Cocec ac3
Pixel width 528
Pixel height 480